Vaccinated Children Twice as Likely to Get Asthma and Allergies

In a study published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics were findings that supported three previous studies on the same subject. This study reviewed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which was conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics from 1988 to 1994. Parents of 13,944 infants, children and adolescents from 2 months through 16 years old, were interviewed to check their history of asthma and allergies in relationship to the children receiving the DPT (diphteria-tetanus-pertussis) vaccine.

The results showed a significant increase in the likelihood of children to get allergies and asthma after having received the DPT shot. The following numbers are the increase in chance that a child will have these problems if they are vaccinated with DPT. Asthma - 2.0 times more likely. Severe allergic reaction - 1.5 times more likely. Sinus problems - 1.81 times more likely. Wheezing - 1.23 times more likely. Nose and eye problems - 2.22 times more likely. Respiratory problems - 1.68 times more likely.

The authors of the study were quick to point out that their findings were not unique, and did in fact reproduce findings of other studies. "Six studies have recently addressed the association between pertussis or DTP immunizations and allergy-related disease. Our results are similar to findings reported from three retrospective cohort studies."